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Mercedes-Benz recalls prestige models

By David Bonnici, 24 Aug 2020 Car News

The German carmaker has recalled models including the popular A- and C-Class and all-electric EQC for a potentially dangerous issues

Mercedes-Benz ECQ recalled

Mercedes-Benz has issued a recall for a potentially dangerous fault across a range of prestige models including the C-Class, GLC and all-electric EQC.

The above-mentioned models, plus the E-Class and GT-Class (AMG GT), have an issue with the rear backrest lock. In the event of an accident with a heavy load in the boot, the cargo could strike the backrest of the left-rear seat causing the backrest lock to fail.

Mercedes-Benz EQC rear seats

According to Product Safety Australia, “if the backrest lock fails, this increases the risk of injury or death of the vehicle occupants, especially in the left rear seat.

The good news is the fault only affects 232 cars sold between March 1 and June 30, 2020.

Click here for a VIN list of affected vehicles.

MORE: What is a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)

A-Class recall

Another Mercedes-Benz recall issued on the same day, however, has a much wider reach, with 4227 2018-2019 A-Class variants sold nationally between September 1, 2018 and April 30, 2019.

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

The fault involves an incorrectly-installed air-conditioning condensation drain hose can lead to water leakage, which can create a variety of potential electrical issues.

MORE: What to do if your car is recalled

These may include:

  • Airbag control unit failure
  • The vehicle being unable to start
  • Engine limp-home mode activated during vehicle operation
  • Fuel pump failure
  • The Emergency call system can be impaired.

Click here for a list of affected vehicles.

Consumers in each instance are asked to contact their most convenient Mercedes-Benz dealer or Customer Support for a free of charge repair.

MORE: Why a recall isn't all bad news