LS-powered 1996 Daihatsu Feroza - HAMMERTIME

We caught up with the husband-and-wife team of Brad and Britt Kilby and their HAMMERTIME Daihatsu at Summernats Slam

Daihatsu Feroza

MARRIED couples enjoying the same hobby can be rare, but Oberon pair Brad and Britt Kilby share a love of setting burnout pads on fire in HAMMERTIME, their LS-powered ’96 Daihatsu Feroza. We caught up with Britt after she did one of the best skids of the Summernats Slam finals.

Photos: Simon Davidson

How did you get into skids?

We’d been attending burnouts as spectators for years, and a Feroza with a five-litre came up for sale on Facebook, which we bought for $800 and took to a couple of events. But the engine was tired and the car looked terrible, so we figured we’d build something bigger and better. We had some parts there and morphed it all together.

How is the Feroza set up?

It’s actually a ’99 GU Patrol chassis that has over 550mm cut out of it, with a ’96 Feroza body on top. When Brad rolled it out of the garage, I wasn’t a fan, but once the body went on top, our kids loved it and were saying: “It’s a monster truck!” We have a background in off-roading, so we were watching Diesel Brothers one night and they painted a truck in bed-liner, so we thought that would be a great option to prevent belt slap and other damage you get on the pad.

What’s the powerplant?

It started with an LS1 we’d put together, but that got a bit tired, so we got a 403ci iron block built through North Vic Engines, running twin carbs and methanol. It has a reverse-pattern, 1000hp-rated Hughes TH400 that we got from Rocket Industries, and a standard Patrol diff. It did 18 months of abuse, and we put one shim in it and that standard LSD is still holding up!

How did it become known as HAMMERTIME?

Driving home one time, the MC Hammer song [You Can’t Touch This] – “stop, hammer time!” – came on the radio and I joked that it would make a great name for a burnout car, because you’re hammering it. But then Brad liked it, even though I didn’t, and it stuck! It actually has two other nicknames for us, The Turd and The Mullet, which we called it because it looks half-decent at the front and it’s a party out the back!

Was there anyone in particular who inspired you to get out on the pad?

I wasn’t influenced by anyone; my interest in cars and burnouts just came around, I guess. I used to notice cars on the cover of Street Machine at the servos, and it stemmed from there as I got older and learned more about the scene, learning what I liked.

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