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2019 Hyundai Ioniq is the cheapest EV you can buy

By Cameron Kirby, 27 Nov 2018 News

2019 Hyundai Ioniq is the cheapest EV you can buy

The entry price to pure electric driving in Australia just got lower

HYUNDAI has officially launched a three-pronged eco-focused Ioniq range in Australia.


Above: Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in

With a trio of electrified variants (hybrid, plug-in electric, and pure electric), Hyundai has played the value card hard, with even the priciest model coming in at less than $50,000. Each Ioniq is available in either Elite or Premium trim levels.

Overseas first drive: 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Electric review

Hyundai predicts the pure electric Ioniq will be the most popular, with the Elite starting at $44,990. This makes it the cheapest battery electric car available in Australia, undercutting the Renault Zoe Life by $2500.


Above: Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Powered by a 28kWh Lithium-ion Polymer battery, which translates to 88kW and 295Nm on the dyno, the Ioniq BEV (battery electric vehicle) is good for 230km of real-world electric driving, according to Hyundai Australia.

The BEV Elite is fitted with Hyundai’s SmartSense safety suite, which includes radar cruise control, as standard, along with 16-inch alloy wheels, and eight-inch infotainment screen, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and a seven-inch TFT digital instrument cluster.

Priced at $48,990 the Ioniq BEV Premium adds a power glass sunroof, heated and ventilated front seats, leather appointed interior, a powered driver’s seat with memory, and wireless phone charging.

Read next: Hyundai Ioniq v Toyota Prius comparison review

If a pure electric isn’t right for you, Hyundai offers a plug-in hybrid which is capable of 63km of electric driving thanks to an 8.9kWh Lithium-ion Polymer battery. However, it also a 1.6-litre Atkinson cycle combustion engine, which combined with the battery produces a peak output of 104kW.

This is sent to the front wheels via a six-speed dual-clutch transmission.

The Ioniq PHEV Elite is priced from $40,990, while the Premium will set you back $45,490.

Hyundai’s Ioniq hybrid is not capable of extended pure-electric driving, but is fitted with a 1.56kWh Lithium-ion Polymer battery to assist the 1.6-litre four-cylinder petrol engine.


Above: Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid

The hybrid Ioniq Elite is the cheapest car in the range with a $33,990 sticker price, while the Premium costs $38,990.