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New Ford Fiesta ST gains optional LSD

By Chris Thompson, 13 Mar 2018 News

New Ford Fiesta ST gains optional LSD

Quaife diff comes to the 149kW mini hot hatch as an option in the next gen

Ford has revealed new information regarding the next-gen Fiesta ST.

Most importantly is the addition of an optional Quaife LSD to the mini hot hatch, which aims to keep its 149kW/290Nm being put to good use.

The 1.5-litre EcoBoost three-pot now allows a sprint to 100km/h in just 6.5 seconds.

Launch control is also an option, while active exhaust and even cylinder deactivation are added as standard.

“Hot-hatch drivers are expecting big things from this small car,” European Ford Performance director Leo Roeks says.

“We’ve applied what we’ve learned from recent Ford Performance models including the Focus RS and Ford GT to develop an all-new Fiesta ST that sets a new standard for driving fun in its segment.

Worthy Watch: Ford Performance range faces off on track

“Performance car drivers will be familiar with the dreaded ‘one-wheel peel’, where a fast corner exit is hampered by an overload of torque to the inside wheel.

“We’ve tuned the all-new Fiesta ST’s mechanical LSD option to work seamlessly with enhanced Torque Vectoring Control to deliver the best possible natural traction without ‘burning away’ excess torque with brake interventions.”

He says Ford also spent plenty of time making sure the Fiesta ST has the optimum suspension setup to be effective for hard driving, but comfortable for daily use.

Ford has decided on twist-beam rear suspension with “non-uniform, non-interchangeable, directionally-wound springs”, which should make the Fiesta easier to turn in sharply.

“We went through three times the normal number of suspension iterations to find a set-up that delivered the exciting driving experience demanded of an ST model, but also comfort and refinement for everyday driving.

“The car’s sophisticated dampers self-adjust to tune out high-frequency road imperfections when there is limited demand for damping – like on the motorway, but adjust again to deliver optimised road-holding performance when driven hard.”