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The best modernised classic cars

By Chris Thompson, 05 Sep 2018 News

Best Restomods and Recreations news

These motoring icons have all been reimagined to better suit the modern age

Taking something old and making it ‘new’ without disrespecting the work that had already been done is difficult, but a few car lovers in the world have managed to pull it off incredibly well.

Prefer more modern tuning? Check out Hot Tuner!

Most recently, a man named Euginio Amos has done this with the Lancia Delta Integrale – it’s called the Lancia Delta Futurista, and it’s a 1250kg, 250kW (approximately, he says) Delta that’ll cost around 300,000 Euro and be much easier to live with than the original.

So, we’ve picked our favourite rebuilt versions of classic and iconic cars that we’d happily own.

Singer DLS Porsche 911 (Dynamics and Lightweighting Study)

The latest, and probably greatest, creation from US-based outfit Singer is claimed to be ‘the most advanced air-cooled Porsche 911 in the world’, and we reckon they might be right.

Built in partnership with Williams Advanced Engineering, the DLS features a 373kW air-cooled, N/A flat-six, in a car that weighs just 990kg. You do the maths.

Eagle E-Type

The 'most beautiful car in the world' probably isn’t the most driveable car in the world, so having the people at Eagle give it the ‘zero-mile’ resto treatment is probably not a bad idea if you want a Jag from the 1960s that can be driven hard.

Rebuilt engines, bespoke body shells, upgraded chassis components, and even a custom tune make these E-Types just a little more special. They’re also not cheap.

Fezza Reborn: Ferrari 348 by Evoluto Automobili

Alfaholics GTA-R 290

Owning an old Italian car would be much less stressful if that car happened to have been rebuilt from the ground up.

A 2.3-litre Alfa Romeo Twin Spark engine produces 179kW in this 830kg beastie. A monocoque steel body, carbon fibre doors, bonnet, and bootlid, and a brakes and suspension upgrade fit for a racer car leads Alfaholics to call this a car “capable of lapping the Nurburgring in under 8 minutes.”

We’d like to see them try. Please?

Mini Remastered by David Brown Automotive

“All the style, technology and engineering excellence that encompasses our ethos, whilst retaining all the spirit and personality of the original.” It’s the perfect description of what David Brown (not the Aston guy) has done with these Brit classics.

Modernised infotainment, mod cons, plus reappointed interior materials and updated exterior features give a restored Mini away, but under the tiny bonnet, a rebuilt 1275cc engine will prove more reliable than the original. Not much faster, though.

Gunther Werks 400R Porsche 993 911

As another of the world’s most famous Porsche restorers and modifiers, the Gunther Werks approach is slightly different from that of the Singer philosophy.

A slightly more aggressive change is made to the exterior of the 400R, but its engine isn’t quite up to the Singer/Williams standard. The body, however, it completely carbon.

Check out Memminger's 'hot rod' Beetle!

Its interior also strays further from ‘what is Porsche’, though we suspect there are some who prefer that approach.

Mechatronik Engineering ‘M-Coupé/M-Cabriolet/M-SL’

The W111 and W113 series of Mercedes-Benz sports cars, built in the ‘60s, is gorgeous no matter when you were born or what cars you like.

Similarly, AMG’s V8 engines are incredible morsels of engineering, and produce some of the biggest smiles known to man.

Put these two together… and you’ve probably got a death trap – unless it’s built by people who know what they’re doing.

In the SL, Mechatronik uses AMG’s 4.3-litre atmo bent eight in conjunction with a modern brake system, modified chassis, and safety features such as ABS. The result is a car that looks positively original until you lift the bonnet or put it on a hoist.

Similarly, the W111 Coupe and Cabrio score AMG’s brutal 5.5-litre V8, plus Mechatronik says all of its work is completely reversable.

To read more about the Lancia Delta Futurista, head over to Unique Cars.