These are the electric vehicles you can buy with the Victorian Govt EV subsidy

What the electric market currently has to offer under $69,000

MG ZS EV

Victorians are now being offered $3000 off the ticket price of an electric (or hydrogen) car in a Government bid to go green – but for the $69,000 spending limit, what can you actually buy in Australia right now?

For all the excitement over recent reveals of EVs across the world, the answer is unfortunately not much. There are some great options, but variety is limited.

Here’s what’s available Down Under. Prices all are driveaway after the $3000 subsidy has been applied.

Hyundai Kona electric
Hyundai Kona Electric

Hyundai Kona

The facelifted 2021 Hyundai Kona Electric went on sale in April costing $68,320 for its range-topping Highlander and $64,152 for the Elite variant.

The Kona Electric Elite and Highlander are powered by a 65kWh battery that drives the electric motor and provides exceptional power and torque.

It is one of the most efficient electric vehicles, with a driving range of about 440kms, or about 320km when charged at 80 per cent.

Some EVs have longer ranges, but they also have bigger batteries that take longer to charge. Charge time is claimed to take 47 minutes when done with a 100kW DC fast charger.

The Kona Electric comes with a five-year, unlimited kilometre warranty.

Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Hyundai Ioniq

Like its Kona sibling, the Ioniq is also available in two variants – Premium and Elite.

The 2021 Hyundai Ioniq Electric costs $54,784 for the Premium version and $50,576 for the Elite.

Both are powered by a 38.3kWh battery. Its electric motor produces 100kW of power and 295Nm of torque.

It has a claimed driving range of about 311kms (WLTP combined) and a charge time of approximately 6.5 hours using a 7.2kW charger.

The Ioniq Electric also comes with a five-year, unlimited km warranty.

MG ZS EV
MG ZS EV

MG ZS EV

Already the cheapest EV on sale in Australia, the MG ZS EV will now cost eligible Victorian buyers $40,990.

The 2021 MG ZS EV is powered by a 44.5kWh battery and provides 105kW of power and 353Nm of torque.

It has a claimed driving range of about 263kms (WLTP combined) and a charge time of approximately seven hours using a 7kW charger.

The ZS also comes with a five-year, unlimited km warranty. As for the battery warranty, that’s covered for eight years or 160,000km.

2020 Mini Cooper SE
Mini Cooper SE

Mini Cooper Hatch SE First Edition

Mini’s electric hot hatch has sold out in Australia for the moment – but expect to see it hit our shores very soon with orders being accepted on new deliveries now (expected no later than September) costing $58,467 for the Classic trim and $65,945 for the higher-spec Mini Yours.

The 2021 Mini Cooper SE is powered by a 33kWh battery, making 135kW of power and 270Nm of torque.

It has a claimed driving range of about 233kms (WLTP combined) and a charge time (up to 80 per cent) of approximately 3.5 hours using a 7.4kW AC charger.

The SE comes with a three-year, unlimited km warranty.

2021 nissan leaf e+
Nissan Leaf e+

Nissan Leaf e+ ZE1

The Nissan Leaf e+ went on sale in April costing $61,990.

It features a 62kWh battery (up from 40kWh) that can propel the small five-door 385 kilometres on a single charge (WLTP combined), representing a 110-kilometre improvement over the standard Leaf.

It produces 160kW of power and 340Nm of torque, and has a claimed charge time of approximately 11.5 hours using a 6.6kW on-board charger or 32A wall box.

The Nissan Leaf comes with a five-year, unlimited km warranty.

Renault Kangoo Maxi Z.E

Renault Kangoo Maxi Z.E LWB

The only electric van in this line-up, the Renault Kangoo Maxi Z.E costs $51,684.

The electric Kangoo is fitted with a 33kWh battery and provides 44kW of power and 225Nm of torque.

It has a claimed driving range of about 200km and charges in approximately six hours using a 7kW wall box.

The Kangoo Maxi Z.E comes with a three-year, unlimited km warranty. The battery warranty lasts for five years or 100,000km.

Tesla Model 3
Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3

The Tesla Model 3 will now set you back $65,094 for the Standard Range Plus. Unfortunately its Long Range and Performance variants are above the Vic Government’s $69,000 cap.

This ‘entry level’ RWD model has a 50kWh battery, generating 190kW of power and 375Nm of torque.

It has a claimed driving range of about 508km (although it’s worth noting that Tesla still officially quotes this as an NEDC-achieved figure) and a charge time of approximately 5.5 hours using an 11kW AC charger.

The Standard Range Plus comes with a four year or 80,000km warranty, and eight year or 160,000km battery warranty.

 

How are you finding our new site design? Tell us in the comments below or send us your thoughts at feedback@whichcar.com.au.

 

Subscribe to Australian car magazines

Subscribe to any of our motoring magazines and save up to 49%


Subscribe

 

NEWS

New entry-level Jeep crossover
News

Entry-level Jeep SUV set for production in 2022

Details emerge for Jeep’s new entry-level SUV

8 May 2021
Tristan Tancredi

We recommend

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.