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Vandenbrink unveils coachbuilt Ferrari 612 Shooting Brake

By Daniel Wong, 11 Jun 2019 News

Vandenbrink coachbuilt Ferrari 612 Shooting Brake news

Shooting Brake body transforms controversial coupe into a wonder wagon

Despite being named after Enzo Ferrari’s favourite coachbuilder, the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti was far from Maranello’s finest creations when it came to its looks.

While criticised for its flabby looks, Dutch coachbuilder Vandenbrink Design on the other hand thinks that what the old Scaglietti could do with is a “Shooting Brake” wagon treatment.

Christened the Vandenbrink Shooting Brake, the coachbuilt Scaglietti wagon was first presented as a concept in 2008, and has only recently been commissioned by Maurik van den Heuvel of Netherlands-based exotic car dealership Classic Youngtimers Consultancy.

Based on a 2005 Scaglietti, Vandenbrink ‘s coachbuilding work features an elegantly sculpted roofline that incorporates two glass moon roofs over the two individual rear seats with a sizeable leather-upholstered boot in the back.

Besides its new bodywork, Vandenbrink left the Scaglietti’s 397kW/588Nm 5.75-litre V12 untouched, which would mean that this Shooting Brake should come close to the standard Scaglietti’s 0-100km/h time of 4.2sec, even while lugging its new wagon body and any contents that happens to be on board.

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Though it is the only one of its kind, Vandenbrink plans to produce a limited run of Shooting Brakes only on bespoke order.

While there are no firm pricing details on what such a coachbuilding job would ensue, Van den Heuvel’s Shooting Brake is currently listed on the Classic Youngtimers’ website with an asking price of 300,000 Euros, around three times the valuation of standard used Scaglietti, though we would hazard a guess that the final bill for such a custom job would be a lot more than the difference in value itself.